Best of June

Buy Clotilde’s latest book, The French Market Cookbook!

Montmartre rooftops

What’s new?

At the very beginning of June, I was in Dallas to attend my life coach training with Brooke Castillo. It was an amazing learning experience, and I am on track to be certified in September. (Sign up to be notified when my English coaching site goes live!)

I had a lot of fun in Dallas reconnecting with some dear friends, and the trip ended on a really high note with a signing at Interabang Books, the kind of indie bookstore everyone should support. It was a wonderful crowd that night, and if you were among them, I love you and thank you!

If you haven’t been able to attend any of the signings and events I hosted around the release of my latest cookbook Tasting Paris, you can watch the talk I gave at the American Library in Paris back in May. That was a really fun night, too.

You can also listen to this podcast interview I did with the wonderful Leticia Ringe, in which I go over some of my life changes in a way I had never really shared before.

Parisian tiles matching my shoes

Parisian tiles matching my shoes

In other news, Maxence and I have set our hearts on a new apartment that we will be moving into with our sons in a few months. We are staying right here in Montmartre — can’t imagine living anywhere else now! — and this new place will have, get this, a bedroom for us and a bedroom for the children. Pretty sweet.

If you’re a Montmartre lover, too, check out these two shirts I designed to celebrate our common passion: this one has a drawing I did myself, inspired by the buildings of the neighborhood (I have it in slate grey); this one has a fun line in French (I have it in orange).

Montmartre Shirt

Work on your French this summer!

Do you wish you could improve your French, but can’t seem to find the time to? How about you take advantage of the summer to get back into it? I have partnered with Frantastique to offer you a free one-month trial of their service, which is a personalized French email course that gets delivered straight to your inbox. It has been tried and tested by many of my readers, and I have gotten great feedback from them. As a C&Z subscriber, you get your first month free, no strings attached, to see how you like it.

Frantastique

Summertime Favorites

Do you want to eat more home-cooked meals this summer? My batch-cooking plan for summer will be perfect for you! All vegetarian, all seasonal, all delicious.

If you plan to cram as many picnics as you can into your schedule, I want to point you to my best picnic tips and my favorite picnic recipes.

And with those lovely berries you’ll snatch up at the market, try my cherry clafoutis or this amazing raspberry yogurt cake my family adores.

The post Best of June appeared first on Chocolate & Zucchini.

from Chocolate & Zucchini https://ift.tt/2lKlliq
via IFTTT

Best of June

Buy Clotilde’s latest book, The French Market Cookbook!

Montmartre rooftops

What’s new?

At the very beginning of June, I was in Dallas to attend my life coach training with Brooke Castillo. It was an amazing learning experience, and I am on track to be certified in September. (Sign up to be notified when my English coaching site goes live!)

I had a lot of fun in Dallas reconnecting with some dear friends, and the trip ended on a really high note with a signing at Interabang Books, the kind of indie bookstore everyone should support. It was a wonderful crowd that night, and if you were among them, I love you and thank you!

If you haven’t been able to attend any of the signings and events I hosted around the release of my latest cookbook Tasting Paris, you can watch the talk I gave at the American Library in Paris back in May. That was a really fun night, too.

You can also listen to this podcast interview I did with the wonderful Leticia Ringe, in which I go over some of my life changes in a way I had never really shared before.

Parisian tiles matching my shoes

Parisian tiles matching my shoes

In other news, Maxence and I have set our hearts on a new apartment that we will be moving into with our sons in a few months. We are staying right here in Montmartre — can’t imagine living anywhere else now! — and this new place will have, get this, a bedroom for us and a bedroom for the children. Pretty sweet.

If you’re a Montmartre lover, too, check out these two shirts I designed to celebrate our common passion: this one has a drawing I did myself, inspired by the buildings of the neighborhood (I have it in slate grey); this one has a fun line in French (I have it in orange).

Montmartre Shirt

Work on your French this summer!

Do you wish you could improve your French, but can’t seem to find the time to? How about you take advantage of the summer to get back into it? I have partnered with Frantastique to offer you a free one-month trial of their service, which is a personalized French email course that gets delivered straight to your inbox. It has been tried and tested by many of my readers, and I have gotten great feedback from them. As a C&Z subscriber, you get your first month free, no strings attached, to see how you like it.

Frantastique

Summertime Favorites

Do you want to eat more home-cooked meals this summer? My batch-cooking plan for summer will be perfect for you! All vegetarian, all seasonal, all delicious.

If you plan to cram as many picnics as you can into your schedule, I want to point you to my best picnic tips and my favorite picnic recipes.

And with those lovely berries you’ll snatch up at the market, try my cherry clafoutis or this amazing raspberry yogurt cake my family adores.

The post Best of June appeared first on Chocolate & Zucchini.

from Chocolate & Zucchini https://ift.tt/2lKlliq
via IFTTT

Pissaladière (French Onion Tart) Recipe

Buy Clotilde’s latest book, The French Market Cookbook!

Pissaladière (French Onion Tart)

Pissaladière is a specialty from Nice, in the South of France. It’s a thin-crust onion tart topped with black olives and anchovies, baked on a pizza-style dough.

The name comes from pissalat (pee-sah-lah), a Provençal condiment of puréed anchovies, cloves, thyme and bay leaves that used to be spread on the dough before baking. Nowadays, it’s rare for the cook to actually make this condiment; it’s more common to feature the anchovies whole and on top, as I’m showing you here.

Pissaladière (French Onion Tart)

My paternal grandmother was from the North of France originally, but she lived in the South for decades — in Marseille as a newlywed, then in Vence when my grandfather retired. As a result, her cooking repertoire was full of Provençal hits, and my mother, who learned a lot about cooking from her, made many of the same dishes when I was growing up. (Hence the zucchini bias.)

Pissaladière (French Onion Tart)

Pissaladière was a favorite as soon as the days got a little warmer: the ingredients for it are available year-round, but it is definitely a summery dish in spirit, one that is best enjoyed when you make it — if at all possible — on vacation with your mother and sister, while your father prepares his signature vinaigrette for the greens you will serve on the side.

Pissaladière (French Onion Tart)

Who among you remembers that I had first posted a recipe for pissaladière back in 2004? Fourteen years ago, my friends, fourteen years ago! But naturally the photo was hideous, and the recipe wasn’t very precise, so I thought it was high time for a fresh take on this timeless treat.

Pissaladière (French Onion Tart)

And I am delighted to present it to you with the gorgeous photos that my photographer-friend Céline de Cérou took in the shade of her very own olive tree, in her beautiful garden in Marseille, the very city where my grandmother likely made her first pissaladière back in the 1930’s.

Full circle indeed.

Pissaladière (French Onion Tart)

Have you tried this? Share your pics on Instagram!

Please tag your pictures with #cnzrecipes. I’ll share my favorites!

Pissaladière (French Onion Tart) Recipe

Prep Time: 1 hour

Cook Time: 30 minutes

Total Time: 2 hours, 30 minutes

Serves 4

Pissaladière (French Onion Tart) Recipe

Ingredients

    For the bread dough:
  • 250 grams (about 2 cups) all purpose wheat flour (I use T65 flour)
  • 1 teaspoon instant yeast
  • 120 ml (1/2 cup) lukewarm water
  • 1/2 teaspoon fine sea salt
  • 1 tablespoon olive oil
  • 1/2 teaspoon herbes de Provence (mix of dried herbs such as thyme, rosemary, basil…)
  • For the topping:
  • 1 tablespoon olive oil
  • 600 grams (1 1/3 pounds) yellow onions, thinly sliced
  • 1/4 teaspoon fine sea salt
  • 50 grams (1 3/4 ounces) fillets of anchovies packed in olive oil, drained
  • A dozen black olives
  • Fresh thyme or rosemary
  • Fleur de sel

Instructions

  1. Start preparing the bread dough 2 hours before.
  2. Place the flour in a large bowl and form a well in the center. Pour the lukewarm water into the well, add the instant yeast, and let rest for 5 minutes.
  3. Add the salt, rosemary, and oil, and mix with a fork until it comes together. Knead on a clean countertop or in a stand mixer fitted with a dough hook, until the dough is smooth and elastic, about 8 minutes with a mixer and 12 to 15 minutes by hand.
  4. Gather the dough into a ball.
  5. Clean the bowl, grease it with a little oil, and add the ball of dough. Cover with a kitchen towel and allow to rise at room temperature for 1 hour.
  6. In the meantime, prepare the sautéed onions.
  7. Heat 1 tablespoon olive oil in a skillet. Add the sliced onions and the salt. Cover, switch to low heat, and cook for 30 minutes, stirring every now and then, until the onions are tender and translucent.
  8. Remove the lid, switch to medium heat, and cook for 5 more minutes, stirring regularly, until almost all the cooking juices have evaporated.
  9. Preheat the oven to 200°C (400°F) and line a baking sheet with parchment paper.
  10. On a lightly floured work surface, roll out the dough into a circle, about 25 cm (10 inches) in width, and transfer to the prepared baking sheet. Spread the sautéed onions on the circle of dough, leaving a margin of about 1 cm (1/3 inch) around the edge.
  11. Bake for 20 minutes, until the edges of the crust have risen and turned golden brown.
  12. Add the anchovies on the pissaladière in a star pattern, top with the olives, and bake for 10 more minutes.
  13. Add a little fresh thyme or rosemary, and a pinch of fleur de sel. Serve hot, slightly warm or cold, with a green salad on the side.

https://cnz.to/recipes/starters/pissaladiere-french-onion-tart-recipe/

Pissaladière (French Onion Tart)

Photography by Céline de Cérou.

The post Pissaladière (French Onion Tart) Recipe appeared first on Chocolate & Zucchini.

from Chocolate & Zucchini https://ift.tt/2MkLS1S
via IFTTT

Pissaladière (French Onion Tart) Recipe

Buy Clotilde’s latest book, The French Market Cookbook!

Pissaladière (French Onion Tart)

Pissaladière is a specialty from Nice, in the South of France. It’s a thin-crust onion tart topped with black olives and anchovies, baked on a pizza-style dough.

The name comes from pissalat (pee-sah-lah), a Provençal condiment of puréed anchovies, cloves, thyme and bay leaves that used to be spread on the dough before baking. Nowadays, it’s rare for the cook to actually make this condiment; it’s more common to feature the anchovies whole and on top, as I’m showing you here.

Pissaladière (French Onion Tart)

My paternal grandmother was from the North of France originally, but she lived in the South for decades — in Marseille as a newlywed, then in Vence when my grandfather retired. As a result, her cooking repertoire was full of Provençal hits, and my mother, who learned a lot about cooking from her, made many of the same dishes when I was growing up. (Hence the zucchini bias.)

Pissaladière (French Onion Tart)

Pissaladière was a favorite as soon as the days got a little warmer: the ingredients for it are available year-round, but it is definitely a summery dish in spirit, one that is best enjoyed when you make it — if at all possible — on vacation with your mother and sister, while your father prepares his signature vinaigrette for the greens you will serve on the side.

Pissaladière (French Onion Tart)

Who among you remembers that I had first posted a recipe for pissaladière back in 2004? Fourteen years ago, my friends, fourteen years ago! But naturally the photo was hideous, and the recipe wasn’t very precise, so I thought it was high time for a fresh take on this timeless treat.

Pissaladière (French Onion Tart)

And I am delighted to present it to you with the gorgeous photos that my photographer-friend Céline de Cérou took in the shade of her very own olive tree, in her beautiful garden in Marseille, the very city where my grandmother likely made her first pissaladière back in the 1930’s.

Full circle indeed.

Pissaladière (French Onion Tart)

Have you tried this? Share your pics on Instagram!

Please tag your pictures with #cnzrecipes. I’ll share my favorites!

Pissaladière (French Onion Tart) Recipe

Prep Time: 1 hour

Cook Time: 30 minutes

Total Time: 2 hours, 30 minutes

Serves 4

Pissaladière (French Onion Tart) Recipe

Ingredients

    For the bread dough:
  • 250 grams (about 2 cups) all purpose wheat flour (I use T65 flour)
  • 1 teaspoon instant yeast
  • 120 ml (1/2 cup) lukewarm water
  • 1/2 teaspoon fine sea salt
  • 1 tablespoon olive oil
  • 1/2 teaspoon herbes de Provence (mix of dried herbs such as thyme, rosemary, basil…)
  • For the topping:
  • 1 tablespoon olive oil
  • 600 grams (1 1/3 pounds) yellow onions, thinly sliced
  • 1/4 teaspoon fine sea salt
  • 50 grams (1 3/4 ounces) fillets of anchovies packed in olive oil, drained
  • A dozen black olives
  • Fresh thyme or rosemary
  • Fleur de sel

Instructions

  1. Start preparing the bread dough 2 hours before.
  2. Place the flour in a large bowl and form a well in the center. Pour the lukewarm water into the well, add the instant yeast, and let rest for 5 minutes.
  3. Add the salt, rosemary, and oil, and mix with a fork until it comes together. Knead on a clean countertop or in a stand mixer fitted with a dough hook, until the dough is smooth and elastic, about 8 minutes with a mixer and 12 to 15 minutes by hand.
  4. Gather the dough into a ball.
  5. Clean the bowl, grease it with a little oil, and add the ball of dough. Cover with a kitchen towel and allow to rise at room temperature for 1 hour.
  6. In the meantime, prepare the sautéed onions.
  7. Heat 1 tablespoon olive oil in a skillet. Add the sliced onions and the salt. Cover, switch to low heat, and cook for 30 minutes, stirring every now and then, until the onions are tender and translucent.
  8. Remove the lid, switch to medium heat, and cook for 5 more minutes, stirring regularly, until almost all the cooking juices have evaporated.
  9. Preheat the oven to 200°C (400°F) and line a baking sheet with parchment paper.
  10. On a lightly floured work surface, roll out the dough into a circle, about 25 cm (10 inches) in width, and transfer to the prepared baking sheet. Spread the sautéed onions on the circle of dough, leaving a margin of about 1 cm (1/3 inch) around the edge.
  11. Bake for 20 minutes, until the edges of the crust have risen and turned golden brown.
  12. Add the anchovies on the pissaladière in a star pattern, top with the olives, and bake for 10 more minutes.
  13. Add a little fresh thyme or rosemary, and a pinch of fleur de sel. Serve hot, slightly warm or cold, with a green salad on the side.

https://cnz.to/recipes/starters/pissaladiere-french-onion-tart-recipe/

Pissaladière (French Onion Tart)

Photography by Céline de Cérou.

The post Pissaladière (French Onion Tart) Recipe appeared first on Chocolate & Zucchini.

from Chocolate & Zucchini https://ift.tt/2MkLS1S
via IFTTT

Best of May

Buy Clotilde’s latest book, The French Market Cookbook!

Lily of the valley

I am writing to you from a hotel room near Dallas, Texas, where I am spending a full week to attend The Life Coach School training with Brooke Castillo.

If you don’t know who Brooke Castillo is, let’s just say she is an amazing woman who has changed my life in more ways than I can list. She is among the people who most inspired me to create my own podcast last year, Change ma vie, and to develop my life coaching practice. Going through her training now is an incredible process, and I will be certified in the coming weeks.

Ever since I launched my podcast, I have received the most wonderful feedback from French-speaking C&Z readers who have “crossed over” to the podcast side, and feel as connected and at home there as they do on the blog. I am honored and thrilled that the life lessons I share there resonate with them, and realize that it’s all part of the same story — feeding the body, feeding the mind, tending to both with the same care and intentionality. (Hear me talk about my experience on Brooke’s podcast — listen from 1:35:50.)

I am very excited about this path, and if you’re curious too, but don’t understand French, please know I am thinking up ways that I can share my take on these discoveries with you in English as well, preferably without accidentally launching a third business. I will keep you posted. (Can’t wait? Get in touch right now!)

Clotilde Dusoulier

Dallas Book Signing this Saturday!

Will you be in or near Dallas, TX, this Saturday, June 2? Or do you have friends who will?

If so, I would love to invite you all to join me at 7pm at Interabang Books, a wonderful indie bookstore that recently opened there (10720 Preston Road, Ste. 1009B, Dallas, 214 484 4289).

I will be discussing Parisian cuisine and French food culture, and you’ll get a chance to ask me any question you have. It will be so fun. And if you’re interested in getting a copy of my cookbook Tasting Paris, I will gladly sign it for you!

I look forward to meeting you then!

TASTING PARIS: 100 Recipes to Eat Like a Local

GDPR and All That Sort of Thing

I didn’t want to add one more email to the piles and piles of GDPR notifications you received and trashed (you’re welcome!) but I do want to point you to my newly updated Privacy Policy.

Travel Essentials

Canelle Spray

• I have told you before about the fresh cinnamon I love to use from Cinnamon Hill. They have just come out with a fun new product: a natural mosquito repellent inspired by the months they spend each year in Sri Lanka, where cinnamon is used to keep mosquitoes at bay, and cinnamon bark oil to soothe mosquito bites. Wherever I go, I am always mosquitoes’ favorite dessert, so I am loving this spray, and I am using it on my legs and arms when we go out to eat dinner at dusk, and the mosquitoes are doing the same. So far so very good!

• A couple of months ago, I purchased this purple backpack from Swedish company FjällRäven. It’s the laptop-friendly backpack, which has a special padded sleeve to slip your laptop in, and padded shoulder straps for more comfort. It’s roomy but not bulky, it’s stylish yet practical — it has proven an ideal companion as I cycle from one appointment to another in Paris, and now I see it is just as perfect when traveling for work.

• I recently discovered the Spanish brand Pölka Shoes, which sells espadrille-inspired shoes handmade in Spain from high-quality materials. I fell in love with this model in the window of a shop in my neighborhood of Montmartre, and they are so comfortable I kind of want to sleep in them. Certainly they are great shoes to bring on a trip like this, as they look put-together but feel like slippers.

Pölka Shoes

The post Best of May appeared first on Chocolate & Zucchini.

from Chocolate & Zucchini https://ift.tt/2xsSt74
via IFTTT

Best of May

Buy Clotilde’s latest book, The French Market Cookbook!

Lily of the valley

I am writing to you from a hotel room near Dallas, Texas, where I am spending a full week to attend The Life Coach School training with Brooke Castillo.

If you don’t know who Brooke Castillo is, let’s just say she is an amazing woman who has changed my life in more ways than I can list. She is among the people who most inspired me to create my own podcast last year, Change ma vie, and to develop my life coaching practice. Going through her training now is an incredible process, and I will be certified in the coming weeks.

Ever since I launched my podcast, I have received the most wonderful feedback from French-speaking C&Z readers who have “crossed over” to the podcast side, and feel as connected and at home there as they do on the blog. I am honored and thrilled that the life lessons I share there resonate with them, and realize that it’s all part of the same story — feeding the body, feeding the mind, tending to both with the same care and intentionality. (Hear me talk about my experience on Brooke’s podcast — listen from 1:35:50.)

I am very excited about this path, and if you’re curious too, but don’t understand French, please know I am thinking up ways that I can share my take on these discoveries with you in English as well, preferably without accidentally launching a third business. I will keep you posted. (Can’t wait? Get in touch right now!)

Clotilde Dusoulier

Dallas Book Signing this Saturday!

Will you be in or near Dallas, TX, this Saturday, June 2? Or do you have friends who will?

If so, I would love to invite you all to join me at 7pm at Interabang Books, a wonderful indie bookstore that recently opened there (10720 Preston Road, Ste. 1009B, Dallas, 214 484 4289).

I will be discussing Parisian cuisine and French food culture, and you’ll get a chance to ask me any question you have. It will be so fun. And if you’re interested in getting a copy of my cookbook Tasting Paris, I will gladly sign it for you!

I look forward to meeting you then!

TASTING PARIS: 100 Recipes to Eat Like a Local

GDPR and All That Sort of Thing

I didn’t want to add one more email to the piles and piles of GDPR notifications you received and trashed (you’re welcome!) but I do want to point you to my newly updated Privacy Policy.

Travel Essentials

Canelle Spray

• I have told you before about the fresh cinnamon I love to use from Cinnamon Hill. They have just come out with a fun new product: a natural mosquito repellent inspired by the months they spend each year in Sri Lanka, where cinnamon is used to keep mosquitoes at bay, and cinnamon bark oil to soothe mosquito bites. Wherever I go, I am always mosquitoes’ favorite dessert, so I am loving this spray, and I am using it on my legs and arms when we go out to eat dinner at dusk, and the mosquitoes are doing the same. So far so very good!

• A couple of months ago, I purchased this purple backpack from Swedish company FjällRäven. It’s the laptop-friendly backpack, which has a special padded sleeve to slip your laptop in, and padded shoulder straps for more comfort. It’s roomy but not bulky, it’s stylish yet practical — it has proven an ideal companion as I cycle from one appointment to another in Paris, and now I see it is just as perfect when traveling for work.

• I recently discovered the Spanish brand Pölka Shoes, which sells espadrille-inspired shoes handmade in Spain from high-quality materials. I fell in love with this model in the window of a shop in my neighborhood of Montmartre, and they are so comfortable I kind of want to sleep in them. Certainly they are great shoes to bring on a trip like this, as they look put-together but feel like slippers.

Pölka Shoes

The post Best of May appeared first on Chocolate & Zucchini.

from Chocolate & Zucchini https://ift.tt/2xsSt74
via IFTTT

Best of May

Buy Clotilde’s latest book, The French Market Cookbook!

Lily of the valley

I am writing to you from a hotel room near Dallas, Texas, where I am spending a full week, attending The Life Coach School training with Brooke Castillo.

If you don’t know who Brooke Castillo is, let’s just say she is an amazing woman who has changed my life in more ways than I can list. She is among the people who most inspired me to create my own podcast last year, Change ma vie, and to develop my life coaching practice. Going through her training now is an incredible process, and I will be certified in the coming weeks.

Ever since I launched my podcast, I have received the most wonderful feedback from French-speaking C&Z readers who have “crossed over” to the podcast side, and feel as connected and at home there as they do on the blog. I am honored and thrilled that the life lessons I share there resonate with them, and realize that it’s all part of the same story — feeding the body, feeding the mind, tending to both with the same care and intentionality. (Hear me talk about my experience on Brooke’s podcast — listen from 1:35:50.)

I am very excited about this path, and if you’re curious too, but don’t understand French, please know I am thinking up ways that I can share my take on these discoveries with you in English as well, preferably without accidentally launching a third business. I will keep you posted. (Can’t wait? Get in touch right now!)

Clotilde Dusoulier

Dallas Book Signing this Saturday!

Will you be in or near Dallas, TX, this Saturday, June 2? Or do you have friends who will?

If so, I would love to invite you all to join me at 7pm at Interabang Books, a wonderful indie bookstore that recently opened there (10720 Preston Road, Ste. 1009B, Dallas, 214 484 4289).

I will be discussing Parisian cuisine and French food culture, and you’ll get a chance to ask me any question you have. It will be so fun. And if you’re interested in getting a copy of my cookbook Tasting Paris, I will gladly sign it for you!

I look forward to meeting you then!

TASTING PARIS: 100 Recipes to Eat Like a Local

GDPR and All That Sort of Thing

I didn’t want to add one more email to the piles and piles of GDPR notifications you received and trashed (you’re welcome!) but I do want to point you to my newly updated Privacy Policy. I also want to remind you that you are receiving this email because you signed up for it on Chocolate & Zucchini, and confirmed that I had permission to email you. You can change your mind at ANY TIME and for ANY REASON by clicking the easy-to-find unsubscribe link at the bottom of every email I send you. I will still think amazing things about you, and I will not take it personally even one little bit. (That’s what life coaching does to you.)

Travel Essentials

Canelle Spray

• I have told you before about the fresh cinnamon I love to use from Cinnamon Hill. They have just come out with a fun new product: a natural mosquito repellent inspired by the months they spend each year in Sri Lanka, where cinnamon is used to keep mosquitoes at bay, and cinnamon bark oil to soothe mosquito bites. Wherever I go, I am always mosquitoes’ favorite dessert, so I am loving this spray, and I am using it on my legs and arms when we go out to eat dinner at dusk, and the mosquitoes are doing the same. So far so very good!

• A couple of months ago, I purchased this purple backpack from Swedish company FjällRäven. It’s the laptop model, which has a special padded sleeve to slip your laptop in, and padded shoulder straps for more comfort. It’s roomy but not bulky, it’s stylish yet practical — it has proven an ideal companion as I cycle from one appointment to another in Paris, and now I see it is just as perfect when traveling for work.

• I recently discovered the Spanish brand Pölka Shoes, which sells espadrille-inspired shoes handmade in Spain from high-quality materials. I fell in love with this model in the window of a shop in my neighborhood of Montmartre, and they are so comfortable I kind of want to sleep in them. Certainly they are great shoes to bring on a trip like this, as they look put-together but feel like slippers.

Pölka Shoes

The post Best of May appeared first on Chocolate & Zucchini.

from Chocolate & Zucchini https://ift.tt/2xsSt74
via IFTTT

La Cornue Range: A Factory Tour!

Buy Clotilde’s latest book, The French Market Cookbook!

La Cornue

A few weeks back, I had the opportunity to visit the workshop where La Cornue stoves are manufactured. La Cornue is the French brand for luxurious kitchen ranges, and is this year celebrating this year the 110th anniversary of its famous vaulted oven, first created in 1908.
 
I’ve always loved factory tours, and this one lived up to my expectations. I’ve been dreaming of La Cornue ranges for a long time, and I was glad to confirm that the perception I had — that of a luxurious artisan brand — was indeed reflected in the high standards maintained in every step of production.

Come along and follow me backstage through these photos. They were all shot in Saint-Ouen l’Aumône, in the Val d’Oise, a département northwest of Paris, which has been the only manufacturing site since the 1970s. The enameling process, which requires specialized ovens, is the only step outsourced to a partner based in Strasbourg.

Each range is made to order for a given customer, and the purchase order follows the range throughout production, so that each craftsman knows whom they are working for, and where on the planet the range will be shipped and installed once finished.

Sheets of metal

Everything starts with the thick metal plates that the range will be made of, based on the customer’s preference: stainless steel or copper. The stove’s structure, but also every screw, every welding, will be made from the chosen material.

This punching machine is used to cut out the various parts that make up the stove.

The punched parts.

The punched parts.

Here are the “hollowed out” sheets that have been punched.

Here are the “hollowed out” sheets that have been punched.

This is a folding machine to fold the sheets of metal. The use of machinery at La Cornue aims at making the craftsmen’s work less strenuous, without replacing their know-how. Here, the craftsman is inserting the parts that need bending, and adjusts the pressure depending on the required result.

The frame of the range is emerging.

The frame of the range is taking shape.

La Cornue logo

The La Cornue logo is “punched” into the metal.

La Cornue

The company is looking to increase the number of women within its production team. Here is Sarah, who happens to be the best welder on the team.

La Cornue

Each welder has their own workstation outlined with curtains, so they can work without disturbing one another. Welding quality is paramount to a flawless enamelling.

La Cornue

The stoves are made from stainless steel or enameled copper, and each customer can choose the color of the enamel. French customers usually go for neutral colors, while foreigners often choose bolder, more colorful options!

La Cornue

The trims can be made from nickel, chrome, copper… and this sample helps visualize the result.

La Cornue

These “color palette” samples are sent to every La Cornue store or dealer around the world.

La Cornue

When the parts are back from enamelling in Alsace, they are examined closely to check the color against the sample, and check consistency of color among all the parts, so that the color of the stove is perfectly even.

La Cornue

Here are the trims that will be mounted on the range once all the parts are assembled.

La Cornue

The range is assembled “naked”, with all its technical elements: gas burner or induction cooktop, simmering hob and, of course, the exclusive vaulted oven (gas or electric), patented by La Cornue, which offers unparalleled heat circulation.

La Cornue

The “naked” range is then tested (power and gas supply) to make sure that everything is working perfectly.

La Cornue

The enameled parts and metal trims are then mounted on the stove.

La Cornue

The La Cornue logo will be engraved with a customized inscription as requested by the customer.

La Cornue

Gray looks great too!

La Cornue

La Cornue also creates complete kitchens, including counters, furnishings, etc. In that case, they are first assembled completely at the workshop, then dismantled, packaged, sent, reassembled and installed in the customer’s kitchen.

La Cornue

The very first vaulted oven models, over a century ago!

What about you?

Are you dreaming of a La Cornue range too?

The post La Cornue Range: A Factory Tour! appeared first on Chocolate & Zucchini.

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La Cornue Range: A Factory Tour!

Buy Clotilde’s latest book, The French Market Cookbook!

La Cornue

A few weeks back, I had the opportunity to visit the workshop where La Cornue stoves are manufactured. La Cornue is the French brand for luxurious kitchen ranges, and is this year celebrating this year the 110th anniversary of its famous vaulted oven, first created in 1908.
 
I’ve always loved factory tours, and this one lived up to my expectations. I’ve been dreaming of La Cornue ranges for a long time, and I was glad to confirm that the perception I had — that of a luxurious artisan brand — was indeed reflected in the high standards maintained in every step of production.

Come along and follow me backstage through these photos. They were all shot in Saint-Ouen l’Aumône, in the Val d’Oise, a département northwest of Paris, which has been the only manufacturing site since the 1970s. The enameling process, which requires specialized ovens, is the only step outsourced to a partner based in Strasbourg.

Each range is made to order for a given customer, and the purchase order follows the range throughout production, so that each craftsman knows whom they are working for, and where on the planet the range will be shipped and installed once finished.

Sheets of metal

Everything starts with the thick metal plates that the range will be made of, based on the customer’s preference: stainless steel or copper. The stove’s structure, but also every screw, every welding, will be made from the chosen material.

This punching machine is used to cut out the various parts that make up the stove.

The punched parts.

The punched parts.

Here are the “hollowed out” sheets that have been punched.

Here are the “hollowed out” sheets that have been punched.

This is a folding machine to fold the sheets of metal. The use of machinery at La Cornue aims at making the craftsmen’s work less strenuous, without replacing their know-how. Here, the craftsman is inserting the parts that need bending, and adjusts the pressure depending on the required result.

The frame of the range is emerging.

The frame of the range is taking shape.

La Cornue logo

The La Cornue logo is “punched” into the metal.

La Cornue

The company is looking to increase the number of women within its production team. Here is Sarah, who happens to be the best welder on the team.

La Cornue

Each welder has their own workstation outlined with curtains, so they can work without disturbing one another. Welding quality is paramount to a flawless enamelling.

La Cornue

The stoves are made from stainless steel or enameled copper, and each customer can choose the color of the enamel. French customers usually go for neutral colors, while foreigners often choose bolder, more colorful options!

La Cornue

The trims can be made from nickel, chrome, copper… and this sample helps visualize the result.

La Cornue

These “color palette” samples are sent to every La Cornue store or dealer around the world.

La Cornue

When the parts are back from enamelling in Alsace, they are examined closely to check the color against the sample, and check consistency of color among all the parts, so that the color of the stove is perfectly even.

La Cornue

Here are the trims that will be mounted on the range once all the parts are assembled.

La Cornue

The range is assembled “naked”, with all its technical elements: gas burner or induction cooktop, simmering hob and, of course, the exclusive vaulted oven (gas or electric), patented by La Cornue, which offers unparalleled heat circulation.

La Cornue

The “naked” range is then tested (power and gas supply) to make sure that everything is working perfectly.

La Cornue

The enameled parts and metal trims are then mounted on the stove.

La Cornue

The La Cornue logo will be engraved with a customized inscription as requested by the customer.

La Cornue

Gray looks great too!

La Cornue

La Cornue also creates complete kitchens, including counters, furnishings, etc. In that case, they are first assembled completely at the workshop, then dismantled, packaged, sent, reassembled and installed in the customer’s kitchen.

La Cornue

The very first vaulted oven models, over a century ago!

What about you?

Are you dreaming of a La Cornue range too?

The post La Cornue Range: A Factory Tour! appeared first on Chocolate & Zucchini.

from Chocolate & Zucchini https://ift.tt/2s2vHO9
via IFTTT

Otium Salad with Roasted Radishes and Shaved Asparagus Recipe

Buy Clotilde’s latest book, The French Market Cookbook!

Otium Salad

Do you know what Otium means? Otium is the Latin word for virtuous leisure, a time free of obligation that is spent in contemplation, and the cultivation of one’s spirit.

This is a concept that resonates with me deeply, as I have become more and more interested in personal development and mind management these past few years, a passion that has led me to create a podcast and a life coaching practice, for which I am about to get certified.

Otium Salad in progress

Otium is also the name of a small vegetarian café in the 9th arrondissement of Paris, in the SoPi neighborhood (more about that here), on rue de La Rochefoucauld, a seventeenth-century writer who is known for clever maxims that would certainly keep your mind productively occupied during your otium time.

I first stumbled upon it some months ago, and thought the space stylish and the food very very good. And because it isn’t far from my shared office space, I occasionally treat myself to a bowl of something that will keep me energized and blush-cheeked, such as this here salad I loved so much on a recent spring day.

Otium Salad

I call this Otium Salad because it’s the recipe I came up with inspired by that day’s salad, and I don’t know a more appropriate name to call a green salad topped with roasted radishes, shaved asparagus, lentils, toasted buckwheat, mint, and a lemony yogurt dressing. So I just think of it as my salade otium, and invite you to do the same.

Otium Salad ingredients

It is not a signature salad of theirs exactly, since their offerings change every couple of weeks, but it is in their signature style: all organic, all fresh, simple and generous, with a judicious balance of flavors and textures, raw juxtaposed with cooked.

One of the clever tricks of this salad, I will note, is that it features roasted radishes (usually eaten raw) and raw shaved asparagus (typically eaten cooked) so it feels both familiar and surprising.

Otium Salad

It is the kind of salad you want to take selfies with; the kind of salad I would gladly live on, and do. Nothing fussy about it, either. Just an inspired mix of bright, springtime flavors I might not have thought to combine in this way, but totally made sense when I did.

Will you try it?

Shaved Asparagus

Photography by Céline de Cérou.

Have you tried this? Share your pics on Instagram!

Please tag your pictures with #cnzrecipes. I’ll share my favorites!

Otium Salad with Roasted Radishes and Shaved Asparagus Recipe

Prep Time: 20 minutes

Cook Time: 25 minutes

Total Time: 45 minutes

Serves 4

Otium Salad with Roasted Radishes and Shaved Asparagus Recipe

Ingredients

  • 100 g (1/2 cup) uncooked green lentils, rinsed
  • 1 head of lettuce
  • A dozen red radishes
  • 8 spears green asparagus
  • 4 tablespoons raw, untoasted buckwheat groats (the pale greenish ones)
  • 8 mint leaves, chopped
  • Fine sea salt, freshly ground black pepper
  • Olive oil
  • For the lemony yogurt dressing:
  • 125 ml (1/2 cup) plain unsweetened yogurt
  • 2 tablespoons tahini
  • 1 tablespoon lemon juice
  • 1 clove garlic, pressed through a garlic press or finely chopped
  • Fine sea salt, freshly ground black pepper

Instructions

  1. The day before, place the lentils in 300 ml (1 1/4 cups) cold water, bring to a simmer and cook for 20 minutes, until the lentils are tender. Drain, rinse and season with 1/4 teaspoon fine sea salt. Refrigerate in an airtight container until the next day.
  2. On the day, preheat the oven to 200°C (400°F) (see Note). Arrange the radishes on a rimmed baking sheet. Drizzle with olive oil and sprinkle with a pinch of salt, insert in the oven and roast for 10 to 20 minutes, depending on the size of your radishes, until they are cooked through and tender.
  3. Make the yogurt dressing. In a mixing bowl, combine the yogurt, tahini, lemon juice, pressed garlic, a pinch of salt and pepper, mixing well. Stir in just a little water, if needed, to get a creamy but pourable sauce. Taste and adjust the seasoning. (The dressing can be prepared up to a day ahead, and kept in the fridge in an airtight container.)
  4. Wash the lettuce and dry carefully in a salad spinner then a clean kitchen towel.
  5. Toast the buckwheat in a dry skillet, stirring frequently, until the groats are lightly brown.
  6. Trim the bottom of the asparagus, just to remove the woody part. Using a mandolin slicer or a vegetable peeler, shave the stalks lengthwise into long, thin ribbons.
  7. Assemble the salad in 4 shallow bowls. Arrange the lettuce leaves first, then divide the cooked lentils, roasted radishes, asparagus ribbons, and chopped mint. Add a drizzle of yogurt dressing and serve.

Notes

  • You can cook double or triple the amount of lentils and freeze the extra.
  • You can add one poached or soft-boiled egg per person.
  • Ideally, the radishes should be roasted before or after another baked dish, such as a cake or bread. If you have no other reason to heat your oven, you can also slice the radishes into paper-thin rounds using a mandolin slicer, and add them raw to the salad.

https://cnz.to/recipes/salads/otium-salad-with-roasted-radishes-and-shaved-asparagus-recipe/

The post Otium Salad with Roasted Radishes and Shaved Asparagus Recipe appeared first on Chocolate & Zucchini.

from Chocolate & Zucchini https://ift.tt/2Kl3jgP
via IFTTT

Otium Salad with Roasted Radishes and Shaved Asparagus Recipe

Buy Clotilde’s latest book, The French Market Cookbook!

Otium Salad

Do you know what Otium means? Otium is the Latin word for virtuous leisure, a time free of obligation that is spent in contemplation, and the cultivation of one’s spirit.

This is a concept that resonates with me deeply, as I have become more and more interested in personal development and mind management these past few years, a passion that has led me to create a podcast and a life coaching practice, for which I am about to get certified.

Otium Salad in progress

Otium is also the name of a small vegetarian café in the 9th arrondissement of Paris, in the SoPi neighborhood (more about that here), on rue de La Rochefoucauld, a seventeenth-century writer who is known for clever maxims that would certainly keep your mind productively occupied during your otium time.

I first stumbled upon it some months ago, and thought the space stylish and the food very very good. And because it isn’t far from my shared office space, I occasionally treat myself to a bowl of something that will keep me energized and blush-cheeked, such as this here salad I loved so much on a recent spring day.

Otium Salad

I call this Otium Salad because it’s the recipe I came up with inspired by that day’s salad, and I don’t know a more appropriate name to call a green salad topped with roasted radishes, shaved asparagus, lentils, toasted buckwheat, mint, and a lemony yogurt dressing. So I just think of it as my salade otium, and invite you to do the same.

Otium Salad ingredients

It is not a signature salad of theirs exactly, since their offerings change every couple of weeks, but it is in their signature style: all organic, all fresh, simple and generous, with a judicious balance of flavors and textures, raw juxtaposed with cooked.

One of the clever tricks of this salad, I will note, is that it features roasted radishes (usually eaten raw) and raw shaved asparagus (typically eaten cooked) so it feels both familiar and surprising.

Otium Salad

It is the kind of salad you want to take selfies with; the kind of salad I would gladly live on, and do. Nothing fussy about it, either. Just an inspired mix of bright, springtime flavors I might not have thought to combine in this way, but totally made sense when I did.

Will you try it?

Shaved Asparagus

Photography by Céline de Cérou.

Have you tried this? Share your pics on Instagram!

Please tag your pictures with #cnzrecipes. I’ll share my favorites!

Otium Salad with Roasted Radishes and Shaved Asparagus Recipe

Prep Time: 20 minutes

Cook Time: 25 minutes

Total Time: 45 minutes

Serves 4

Otium Salad with Roasted Radishes and Shaved Asparagus Recipe

Ingredients

  • 100 g (1/2 cup) uncooked green lentils, rinsed
  • 1 head of lettuce
  • A dozen red radishes
  • 8 spears green asparagus
  • 4 tablespoons raw, untoasted buckwheat groats (the pale greenish ones)
  • 8 mint leaves, chopped
  • Fine sea salt, freshly ground black pepper
  • Olive oil
  • For the lemony yogurt dressing:
  • 125 ml (1/2 cup) plain unsweetened yogurt
  • 2 tablespoons tahini
  • 1 tablespoon lemon juice
  • 1 clove garlic, pressed through a garlic press or finely chopped
  • Fine sea salt, freshly ground black pepper

Instructions

  1. The day before, place the lentils in 300 ml (1 1/4 cups) cold water, bring to a simmer and cook for 20 minutes, until the lentils are tender. Drain, rinse and season with 1/4 teaspoon fine sea salt. Refrigerate in an airtight container until the next day.
  2. On the day, preheat the oven to 200°C (400°F) (see Note). Arrange the radishes on a rimmed baking sheet. Drizzle with olive oil and sprinkle with a pinch of salt, insert in the oven and roast for 10 to 20 minutes, depending on the size of your radishes, until they are cooked through and tender.
  3. Make the yogurt dressing. In a mixing bowl, combine the yogurt, tahini, lemon juice, pressed garlic, a pinch of salt and pepper, mixing well. Stir in just a little water, if needed, to get a creamy but pourable sauce. Taste and adjust the seasoning. (The dressing can be prepared up to a day ahead, and kept in the fridge in an airtight container.)
  4. Wash the lettuce and dry carefully in a salad spinner then a clean kitchen towel.
  5. Toast the buckwheat in a dry skillet, stirring frequently, until the groats are lightly brown.
  6. Trim the bottom of the asparagus, just to remove the woody part. Using a mandolin slicer or a vegetable peeler, shave the stalks lengthwise into long, thin ribbons.
  7. Assemble the salad in 4 shallow bowls. Arrange the lettuce leaves first, then divide the cooked lentils, roasted radishes, asparagus ribbons, and chopped mint. Add a drizzle of yogurt dressing and serve.

Notes

  • You can cook double or triple the amount of lentils and freeze the extra.
  • You can add one poached or soft-boiled egg per person.
  • Ideally, the radishes should be roasted before or after another baked dish, such as a cake or bread. If you have no other reason to heat your oven, you can also slice the radishes into paper-thin rounds using a mandolin slicer, and add them raw to the salad.

https://cnz.to/recipes/salads/otium-salad-with-roasted-radishes-and-shaved-asparagus-recipe/

The post Otium Salad with Roasted Radishes and Shaved Asparagus Recipe appeared first on Chocolate & Zucchini.

from Chocolate & Zucchini https://ift.tt/2Kl3jgP
via IFTTT